Pompeii
Valley of the Kings

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Valley of the Kings also called Valley of the Tombs of the Kings: Tutankhamen’s tomb long narrow defile just west of the Nile River in Upper Egypt. It was part of the ancient city of Thebes and was the burial site of almost all the kings (pharaohs) of the 18th, 19th, and 20th dynasties (1539–1075 bce), from Thutmose I to Ramses X. Located in the hills behind Dayr al-Ba?r?, the 62 known tombs exhibit variety both in plan and in decoration. In 1979 UNESCO designated the valley part of the World Heritage site of ancient Thebes, which also includes Luxor, the Valley of the Queens, and Karnak.

The kings of the New Kingdom (c. 1539–1075 bce), fearing for the safety of their rich burials, adopted a new plan of concealing their tombs in a lonely valley in the western hills behind Dayr al-Ba?r?. There, in tombs sunk deep into the heart of the mountain, pharaohs were interred, as were several queens, a few officials of high rank, and the numerous sons of Ramses II. The plan of the tombs varies considerably but consists essentially of a descending corridor interrupted by deep shafts to baffle robbers and by pillared chambers or vestibules. At the farther end of the corridor is a burial chamber with a stone sarcophagus in which the royal mummy was laid and store chambers around which furniture and equipment were stacked for the king’s use in the next world.

The walls were in many cases covered with sculptured and painted scenes depicting the dead king in the presence of deities, especially the gods of the underworld, and with illustrated magical texts similar to those found in funerary papyri, designed to help him on his journey through the nether regions. There were a number of these texts; they represent differing but not necessarily conflicting views of the afterlife, in which the king had to undergo trials and surmount perils. In the “Book of That Which Is in the Underworld,” for instance, he travels in the boat of the sun god through 12 divisions that represent the 12 hours of the night. In the “Book of Gates,” giant serpents guard the portals through which the sun has to pass as strange demons help or hinder the boat on its way. Other funerary compositions include the “Book of Day” and the “Book of Night,” which depict Nut, the sky-goddess, spread out across the heavens, as well as the “Book of the Heavenly Cow,” in which Nut is transformed into a cow on whom Re ascends to the firmament. Astronomical figures decorate the ceilings of several burial chambers.


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Virtually all the tombs in the valley were cleared out in antiquity. Some had been partially robbed during the New Kingdom, but all were systematically denuded of their contents in the 21st dynasty, in an effort to protect the royal mummies and to recycle the rich funerary goods back into the royal treasury. In the time of Strabo (1st century bce), Greek travelers were able to visit 40 of the tombs. Several tombs were reused by Coptic monks, who left their own inscriptions on the walls. Only the little tomb of Tutankhamun (reigned 1333–23 bce), located on the floor of the valley and protected by a pile of rock chippings thrown down from a later Ramesside tomb, escaped pillage. The wonderful treasures that were exhumed from Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922 and that now reside in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo vividly indicate how rich the burial of a great pharaoh of the empire’s heyday must have been. The longest tomb belongs to Queen Hatshepsut (reigned c. 1472–58), whose burial chamber is nearly 700 feet (215 metres) from the entrance and descends 320 feet (100 metres) into the rock.

The largest and most complex tomb in the Valley of the Kings was apparently built to contain the burial chambers of many of the sons of Ramses II (reigned 1279–13), the greatest king of the 19th dynasty. This tomb, which had been previously discovered but dismissed as insignificant, was again located in the late 1980s and partially excavated in the 1990s. The uppermost of the tomb’s two levels contains a central pillared hall and various corridors leading away to dozens of chambers. The ancient Egyptians built massive public monuments to their pharaohs. But they also spent time and treasure creating hidden underground mausoleums that no one was ever meant to see. The most famed collection of such elaborate tombs—the Valley of the Kings—lies on the Nile's west bank near Luxor. During Egypt's New Kingdom (1539-1075 B.C.) the valley became a royal burial ground for pharaohs such as Tutankhamun, Seti I, and Ramses II, as well as queens, high priests, and other elites of the 18th, 19th, and 20th dynasties. The tombs evidence elaborate preparations for the next world, in which humans were promised continuing life and pharaohs were expected to become one with the gods. Mummification was used to preserve the body so that the deceased's eternal soul would be able to reanimate it in the afterlife. The underground tombs were also well stocked with all the material goods a ruler might need in the next world. Treasures—like the golden masks found with King Tut—are dazzling, but the tombs also contained the more mundane. "They included furniture, clothes (even underwear), and jewelry [though] it's curious that we have no books—from Tut at least," says Salima Ikram, a professor of Egyptology at American University in Cairo and a National Geographic grantee. Tombs were also well provisioned with enough food and drink, including wine and beer, for royal feasting in the next world, as well as sacred objects meant to help the deceased achieve eternal life, even favored companions. "[We find] pets buried nearby," Ikram says. "Hunting dogs, pet baboons, and gazelles." More Mysteries Await? Tomb robbers, treasure hunters, and archaeologists have been combing the Valley of the Kings for centuries—yet it continues to yield surprises. Many thought that the 62 tombs discovered before 1922 represented all that would be found in the valley—until Howard Carter discovered the resting place of a boy king called King Tutankhamun. In 2005 a team led by archaeologist Otto Schaden discovered the valley's first unknown tomb since Tutankhamun's. The site, dubbed KV 63, was found only about 50 feet (15 meters) from the walls of Tut's resting place. KV 63 had no mummy but housed sarcophagi, pottery, linens, flowers, and other materials. Some believe it heralds the presence of another as yet undiscovered tomb. "KV 63 is an embalming cache; there must be a tomb to go with it," Ikram says. At least one late Ramesside pharaoh's tomb (Ramses VIII) is still undiscovered, and many believe it may be found within the valley. Clues to such discoveries may be found in period Egyptian writings that mention notables who likely rated tombs but have not been identified. "You try to find out what hasn't been discovered, and figure out where they might possibly be, and then look in those areas," said David P. Silverman, an Egyptologist at the University of Pennsylvania. "You never know what you are going to find." But if more tombs are found, will they be as relatively unmolested as Tut's? The odds are against it. Though their entrances were well hidden, nearly all of the valley's known royal tombs were likely robbed before the end of the 20th dynasty—Egyptian records testify to robbers' trials and to the harsh punishments handed down. By the time the Greek writer Diodorus Siculus visited the valley's tombs (circa 60 B.C.) he wrote, "We found nothing there except the results of pillage and destruction." It's possible, perhaps, that any tomb yet to be found was so well hidden that it also escaped the notice of ancient thieves. Only time will tell.




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Easter Island Secrets
Arizona Wave
Blue Neon Waves
Paracas Skulls
Nasca Lines
Mount Rushmore
Famous Petra
Kukulkan Pyramid Chichen Itza
Valley of the Kings
The Wonder Cave
Stone Forest
Twin Town
Banaue Rice Terraces
Grand Canyon
Ark of the Covenant
El Chupacabra
Ayers Rock
200 yo mummy not dead
Plitvice Lakes
Kittiwake Shipwreck
Waterfalls Rio Tulija
Katmai Crater Lake
Matterhorn Mountain
The Great Wall of China
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Rio de Janeiro
Bermuda Triangle
Two Headed Snake
Spontaneous combustion
Door to Hell
Crystal Underwater Pyramid Cuba
Zhangye Danxia
Terracotta Army
Lencois Mranhenses Brasil
Sailing Stones
Columnar Basalt
Underwater Museum Cancún Mexico
Borobudur Temple
Red Rain
Mausoleum at Halicarnassus
Shroud of Turin
Reed Flute Cave
Victoria Falls
Angkor Wat
Great Pyramid of Giza
Lost Kingdom Of Cleopatra
Hitler fled to Argentina
Everglades Park
Lighthouse of Alexandria
Tunguska Explosion Russia
Leshan Giant Buddha China
Angel Falls
KAMPUNG KUANTAN FIREFLIES
Pillars of weathering
Giant Stone Balls
Aurora
Taj Mahal
Iron Pillar Delhi
GREAT SPHINX OF GIZA
Fly Geyser
Ancient Atomic Bomb India
Underwater Pyramids of Cuba
The Ancient City of Mes Aynak
3,800 year old mummy Xiahoe
Santorini
Valley of Love Ireland
Machu Picchu
Mount Nemrut
Sigiriya Sri Lanka
Leaning Tower of Pisa
K2 Pakistan
Timbuktu
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Acropolis of Athens
Lost Heracleion City
Largest Crab Ever
Area 51










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