Pompeii
Parícutin

Home | Last Added

Parícutin (or Volcán de Parícutin, also accented Paricutín) is a dormant scoria-cone volcano located in the Mexican state of Michoacán, near the city of Uruapan and about 322 km west of Mexico City. The volcano surged suddenly from the cornfield of local farmer Dionisio Pulido in 1943, attracting both popular and scientific attention. This eruption presented the first occasion for modern science to document the full life cycle of an eruption of this type. During the 9-year life span of Parícutin, scientists sketched and mapped it, took samples as well as thousands of photographs of this volcano. By 1952, the volcano left a 424 meter high cone and significantly damaged a 233 km2 area with the ejection of stone, ash and lava. Three people were killed, two towns were completely evacuated and buried by lava and three others were heavily affected. Hundreds of people had to be permanently relocated, with two new towns created to accommodate the migration of people. Although the area still remains highly active volcanically, Parícutin itself is quiet and has become a tourist attraction, with people climbing the volcano itself and visiting the hardened-lava covered ruins of the San Juan Parangaricutiro Church. Parícutin is one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World as assigned by CNN.


Story continues below !















Parícutin erupted from 1943 to 1952, unusually long for this type of volcano and with several eruptive phases.105 For weeks prior, residents of the area reported hearing noises similar to thunder but without clouds in the sky. This sound is consistent with deep earthquakes from the movement of magma.103 A later study indicates that the eruption was preceded by 21 earthquakes over 3.2 in intensity starting five weeks before the eruption. One week prior to the eruption, newspapers reported 25-30 per day. The day before the eruption, the number is estimated at 300.9 The eruption began on February 20, 1943, at about 4pm. The center of the activity was a cornfield near the town of Parícutin, owned by Dionisio Pulido. During that day, he and his family had been working their land, clearing it to prepare for spring planting.8 Suddenly the ground nearby where they were working swelled upward and formed a fissure between 2 and 2.5 meters across. They report that they heard hissing sounds, and smoke which smelled like rotten eggs, indicating the presence of hydrogen sulfide. Within hours, the fissure would develop into a small crater.103 Pulido reported: At 4 p.m., I left my wife to set fire to a pile of branches when I noticed that a crack, which was situated on one of the knolls of my farm, had opened . . . and I saw that it was a kind of fissure that had a depth of only half a meter. I set about to ignite the branches again when I felt a thunder, the trees trembled, and I turned to speak to Paula; and it was then I saw how, in the hole, the ground swelled and raised itself 2 or 2.5 meters high, and a kind of smoke or fine dust -- grey, like ashes -- began to rise up in a portion of the crack that I had not previously seen . . . Immediately more smoke began to rise with a hiss or whistle, loud and continuous; and there was a smell of sulfur.10 He tried to find his family and oxen but they had disappeared so he rode his horse to town where he found his family and friends, happy to see him alive.8 The volcano grew fast and furious after this.3 Witness Celedonio Gutierrez, who witnessed the eruption on the first night reported: …when night began to fall, we heard noises like the surge of the sea, and red flames of fire rose into the darkened sky, some rising 800 meters or more into the air, that burst like golden marigolds, and a rain like artificial fire fell to the ground.3 On that first day, the volcano had begun strombolian pyroclastic activity and within 24 hours, there was a scorian cone fifty meters high, created by the ejection of lapilli fragments up to the size of a walnut and larger, semi molten volcanic bombs. By the end of the week, reports had the cone between 100 and 150 meters high.1038 Soon after the start, the valley was covered in smoke and ash.3 The nine-year activity of the volcano is divided into four stages with names that comes from the Purépecha language. The first phase (Quitzocho) extended from February 22 to October 18, 1943, with activity concentrated in the cracks that formed in the Cuiyusuro Valley, forming the initial cone. During this time, the ejected material was mostly lapilli and bombs.5 In March, the eruption became more powerful, with eruptive columns that extended for several kilometers.10 In four months, the cone reached 200 meters and in eight months 365 meters.5 During this time period, there was some lava flow. On June 12, lava began to advance towards the village of Paricutin, forcing evacuations the next day.10 The second phase went from October 18, 1943 to January 8, 1944 and is called Sapichi, meaning child, referring to the formation of a lateral vent and other openings on the north side of the cone.57 Ash and bombs continued to be ejected but the new vent sent lava towards the town of San Juan Parangaricutiro, forcing its permanent evacuation. By August, the town was completely covered in lava and ash, with only the upper portions of the main church still visible.105 The evacuations of Parícutin and San Juan were able to be accomplished without loss of life, due to the slow movement of the lava.123 These two phases lasted just over a year and account for more than 90% of the total material ejected from the cone, as well as four-fifths (330 meters) of the final height of 424 meters from the valley floor. It also sent ash as far as Mexico City.38 Cinder cone in 1943 The third (Taqué-Ahuan) extended from January 8, 1944 to January 12, 1945 and focuses on the formation of a series of cracks on the south side of the cone as well as an increase of activity in the center. Lava flows from this time mostly extend to the west and northwest. During this period there was also the formation of a mesa now called Los Hornitos to the south.5 Over the next seven years, the volcano became less active, with the ejection of ash, stone and lava coming sporadically, with periods of silence in-between.1085 Professional geologists pulled out of the area in 1948, leaving only Celedonio Gutierrez to continue observations. The last burst of activity was recorded by him between January and February of 1952. Several eruptions occurred in succession and a three-kilometer smoke column was produced




you might be interested


Sailing Stones

Columnar Basalt

Lighthouse of Alexandria

Blue Neon Waves

Reed Flute Cave

Machu Picchu

Borobudur Temple

Wonder Rock

Natural Zhangjiaje

Alien Skulls ?

Valley of Love Ireland

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

Taj Mahal

Aurora

El Chupacabra

Everglades Park

Pamukkale

Black Hole

Famous Petra

Underwater Cancun

Largest Crab Ever

Crystal Underwater Pyramid Cuba

Red Rain

Angel Falls

Lencois Mranhenses Brasil

Terracotta Army

Ark of the Covenant

Angkor Wat

Iron Pillar Delhi

Ancient Atomic Bomb India

Stonehenge Stones

Pillars of weathering

Rio de Janeiro

Nasca Lines

Twin Town

Waterfalls Rio Tulija

Bermuda Triangle

Underwater Museum Cancún Mexico

Pompeii After Eruption

Stone Forest

200 yo mummy not dead

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

Victoria Falls

GREAT SPHINX OF GIZA

Mount Rushmore

Colossus of Rhodes

Easter Island Secrets

Banaue Rice Terraces

The Wonder Cave

Shroud of Turin

Parícutin Vulcan

Ayers Rock

Area 51

Door to Hell

Memnon Colossi

Grand Canyon

Fly Geyser

Arizona Wave

The Great Wall of China

Acropolis of Athens

Plitvice Lakes

Giant Stone Balls

Lost Heracleion City

The Sahara Desert

Hitler fled to Argentina ?

Underwater Pyramids of Cuba

Blue Belize Hole

Spontaneous combustion

Valley of the Kings

Kittiwake Shipwreck

Antarctica

Tutankhamun Mummy

Colosseum Rome Italy

Two Headed Snake

3,800 year old mummy Xiahoe

The Ancient City of Mes Aynak

Leshan Giant Buddha China

Leaning Tower of Pisa

Lost Kingdom Of Cleopatra

Sigiriya Sri Lanka

Tunguska Explosion Russia

Great Pyramid of Giza

Zhangye Danxia

The Matterhorn

Timbuktu

Vimana Flying Machine

Katmai Crater Lake

Mount Nemrut

Yellowstone Park

Bagan Myanmar

Kukulkan Pyramid Chichen Itza

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

KAMPUNG KUANTAN FIREFLIES

Statue of Zeus at Olympia

Santorini

K2 Pakistan


Top visited pages

Angkor Wat
Victoria Falls
Grand Canyon
Memnon Colossi
Stone Forest
Mount Nemrut
Underwater Museum Cancún Mexico
Statue of Zeus at Olympia
Rio de Janeiro
Acropolis of Athens
Largest Crab Ever
Valley of Love Ireland
Easter Island Secrets
Zhangye Danxia
Lighthouse of Alexandria
Santorini
The Ancient City of Mes Aynak
3,800 year old mummy Xiahoe
Shroud of Turin
Colosseum Rome Italy
Lost Heracleion City
Underwater Cancun
Door to Hell
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Stonehenge
Plitvice Lakes
Columnar Basalt
Reed Flute Cave
Waterfalls Rio Tulija
The Wonder Cave
KAMPUNG KUANTAN FIREFLIES
Tunguska Explosion Russia
Kukulkan Pyramid Chichen Itza
Great Pyramid of Giza
Timbuktu
Sailing Stones
Sigiriya Sri Lanka
Paracas Skulls
Angel Falls
Blue Neon Waves
Yellowstone
Mausoleum at Halicarnassus
Tutankhamun Mummy
Arizona Wave
El Chupacabra
Hitler fled to Argentina
Katmai Crater Lake
Twin Town
Valley of the Kings
Parícutin
Everglades Park
Antarctica
Bermuda Triangle
Hanging Gardens of Babylon
K2 Pakistan
Bagan Myanmar
Two Headed Snake
Vimana Flying Machine
Iron Pillar Delhi
Leshan Giant Buddha China
Fly Geyser
GREAT SPHINX OF GIZA
Pillars of weathering
Famous Petra
Leaning Tower of Pisa
The Great Wall of China
Underwater Pyramids of Cuba
Area 51
Colossus of Rhodes
Natural Zhangjiaje
Matterhorn Mountain
Ayers Rock
Red Rain
Pamukkale
Black Hole
Giant Stone Balls
Lencois Mranhenses Brasil
Taj Mahal
200 yo mummy not dead
Sahara Desert
Nasca Lines
Spontaneous combustion
Blue Belize Hole
Wonder Rock
Aurora
Banaue Rice Terraces
Borobudur Temple
Ancient Atomic Bomb India
Pompeii After Eruption
Mount Rushmore
Kittiwake Shipwreck
Lost Kingdom Of Cleopatra
Terracotta Army
Crystal Underwater Pyramid Cuba
Machu Picchu
Ark of the Covenant










back to top


About Us | Privacy Policy